Top Five Middle Eastern Food Blogs

5th Mar 2012

spices spoons

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Dirty Kitchen Secrets
If there’s a more aesthetically pleasing food website out there, from any region, then I’m yet to see it! Not only is Bethany Kehdy a former Miss Universe contestant, but her food photography is stunning. Even more importantly, the recipes are clear, interesting, exotic and mouthwatering. A particular highlight is the pomegranate and za’atar riblets. I’m salivating just thinking about it. Bethany also runs food tours across Lebanon and hosts an international food blogging conference! 

 

Syrian Foodie in London
A personal favourite straight from the old-school days when men were men and blogs were blogs. The photography could be more appealing (who are we to talk though) and Kano sometimes disappears but combining surgery and food blogging can’t be easy. What he does do, however, is have an fantastic selection of simple and delicious recipes for traditional Syrian fare. Ranging from something as basic as an egg sandwich, Syrian style, to more exotic dishes such as chicken livers with pomegranate molasses or muhammara, this is my first stop for authentic Syrian recipes.

 

MidEATS
Run by two American Egyptians, Heba and Brenda, who ‘found each other on the blogosphere,’ this website has hundreds of recipes from right across the region and is further enhanced by interesting copy, features and interviews. They also throw in a bit of fusion and I’ll be sure to cook their nectarine and plum crumble very soon!

 

Anissa Helou
As we are told on her website, ‘Anissa Helou is not at all like the great majority of cookery writers…she has worked for Sotheby’s, opened an antique shop in Paris, was an art consultant to members of the Kuwaiti ruling family and has travelled extensively throughout the world.’ Author of six cookbooks and now running cooking classes in Shoreditch, London, her blog offers a fascinating and tasty look into her kitchen.

 

Antonio Tahhan
Perhaps technically not just Middle Eastern, but there are enough recipes from the region for us to count it. Tahhan, we read, is ‘a new face to the world of cooking, [and] has a genuine passion for food. Coupled with his tongue-in-cheek personality and infectious spirit, he shares his enthusiasm with all those around him. With a flair for Mediterranean cuisine, Tony highlights regional flavours in the dishes he prepares.’ Whether any of this is true, I can’t conclusively say, but his blog features loads of interesting sounding recipes from around the world which reflect the fact that he was born in Venezuela to Middle Eastern parents, grew up in Miami and studied Spanish Literature.

 

What do you reckon? Get in touch and let us know which ones you think we’ve missed out, why you like the ones we have included, or just to say hi!

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15 Comments

  1. Posted 6th Mar 2012 at 11:10 am | Permalink

    I’d like to nominate the wonderful Libyan Food Blog, founded by 3 Libyan women. It has fantastic recipes with step-by-step instructions and photos from a rich and unusual cuisine that seems to be little known outisde Libya.
    http://libyanfood.blogspot.com/
    The blog, to the dismay of its fans, didn’t update for months after the revolution erupted last year but it came back with a flourish for Ramadan. Its founders wrote: “We’ve been thinking about whether we should update the blog, given the situation back home. In some ways, it didn’t seem right to continue as everyone in Libya is dealing with the loss and daily hardship of war. However, five months since the first protests in Benghazi, we have decided to return. We started this blog last Ramadan, and so much has changed since then that Ramadan …”

  2. Posted 6th Mar 2012 at 11:43 am | Permalink

    Thanks Susannah! What a wonderful site and it’s great to see they’ve returned. As much as we should be focusing on the issues in Libya right now, it’s great that these ladies are also spreading the word about the cuisine and cultue of a country which has, for too long, been blighted by Gaddafi’s shadow. We’re firm believers that now, more than ever, is the time to promote the positive aspects of Middle Eastern life and this blog does just that.

  3. Amanda
    Posted 7th Mar 2012 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

    I love all the blogs on your list but I have to say you really missed out by not including Taste of Beirut!!! Joumana is lebanese and has a wonderful blog, she updates often and has breathtaking pictures and often gives a history of the recipes !

  4. Posted 7th Mar 2012 at 6:22 pm | Permalink

    Taste of Beirut is a fabulous blog http://www.tasteofbeirut.com/ and on the Libyan theme We are Food http://foodlibya.wordpress.com/
    Agree with your choice of MidEats and DKS (Bethany’s video’s are brilliant too)

  5. Posted 7th Mar 2012 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

    …and of course the legendary Anissa who is absolutely lovely.

  6. Posted 7th Mar 2012 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

    @ Amanda Taste of Beirut is a fantastic blog, her photography is beautiful and the copy is personal and engaging. If only we’d done a top six! I just felt that it would be remiss to include three Lebanese blogs in such a short list. I also really wanted to include Syrian Foodie in London because, while it might not be as visually appealing as some, he gives the recipes for so many dishes that I fell in love with while living in Damascus.
    @Sally Thanks for the heads up re. http://foodlibya.wordpress.com/ Just had a quick look and it seems like a great site. I should also add that I wish I’d known about you lovely website when I was living in Dubai last year. Your food photography is spectacular and it would have been great to have met up!

  7. Posted 8th Mar 2012 at 5:50 am | Permalink

    Thank you so much for featuring midEATS! We are honored to be listed amongst the best of the best! We hope you do get to try some our recipes.

  8. Posted 8th Mar 2012 at 9:41 am | Permalink

    Hey Brenda, thanks for getting in touch! You’re more than welcome and thanks for a great site. I’ll definitely get around to trying some of the recipes soon.

  9. Posted 23rd Apr 2012 at 2:09 pm | Permalink

    I hope that you can take a look at my blog Ya Salam Cooking
    http://www.yasalamcooking.com/

    • Posted 24th Apr 2012 at 9:56 am | Permalink

      Hi Noor, it looks wonderful! Great to see someone blogging about traditional Saudi cuisine. Not something you see very often. Thanks for the heads up!

  10. Posted 20th Sep 2012 at 6:44 pm | Permalink

    Thank you for this wonderful post.
    Can I suggest http://www.NoGarlicNoOnions.com ?
    I hope you like it

  11. Carli
    Posted 12th Feb 2013 at 12:34 am | Permalink

    These all sound sooo amazing! Just wondering if you’ve come across any good middle eastern food in Toronto? Let me know!! I’d love to try it out!

  12. Donna
    Posted 28th Feb 2013 at 10:50 am | Permalink

    Hi, I was hoping you might be able to help me out. Im looking for a recipe that my old neighbour who was lebanese use to make me. My mum seems to think that it was baby whiting, it was deep fried, whole, head and tail intact, I remember it being quite salty, i dont think breadcrumbs were used and it was quite golden in colour.
    Im desperately tring to find the recipe. Does this recipe sound familiar at all?
    Thanks for your time

    • Posted 4th Mar 2013 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

      Hi Donna, it does indeed! It’s very popular along the coast of Lebanon. There are two different types – bizreh is the equivalent of white bait in the UK and firan is slightly bigger, perhaps a baby snapper or something, although I’m not 100% sure. It’s not easy trying to work out exactly what is what. As far as I’m aware they are coated in flour (no breadcrumbs) and fried, before being eaten whole – heads and all – with a generous squeeze of lemon and tarator sauce! Delicious…although I’ve only eaten and never cooked them so can’t be more specific than that unfortunately (although can give you a long list of places to get them in Lebanon if you’re interested!)

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